1901 Census Monks Horton,
Kent, England

  1881 Census Standford,
 Kent, England

  Bits & Pieces - Humour


Remembrance Day

Christmas in the Workhouse




    


 
OTHER SHRUBSOLES

 Canterbury Shrubsoles

 Faversham Shrubsoles

 Harrietsham Shrubsoles

 Kingston-upon-Thames Shrubsoles

 Maidstone Shrubsoles

 Milton by Sittingbourne Shrubsoles


FOR POSTING YOUR
MISSING LINKS,
BRICK WALLS OR QUERIES

 
SHRUBSOLE FAMILIES FORUM

Home SHRUBSOLE TREE LOCKLEY TREE COLLINS TREE CONTACT ME FACEBOOK GROUP WWI CENTENARY PHOTO ALBUM

HERBERT GEORGE SHRUBSOLE

1891 - 1958

Hearsay:  He was known as Snowball & had a taxi business running 4 or 5 taxi’s in Folkestone.

In Arduis Fidelis

Faithful in Adversity

Private Herbert George Shrubsole 049416 had previously served in The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) from 1908-1910 before rejoining the army 14th Febrary 1915 as a driver in the Army Service Corps.  He served in France from 26 February 1915 until 9th May 1919 with three periods of leave, where he returned to England;  his last period of leave was 28th September 1918 to 12th October 1918 & his 4th child Herbert George was born the following July.  I can't begin to imagine what his life was like during those years in France.  He joined the 46th Divisional Supply Column on 3rd December 1916, was awarded his first Good Conduct badge 8th May 1917 & promoted to Lance Corporal on 12 March 1918.  He was awarded the 1914/15 Star Medal, The British War Medal & The Victory Medal.


1st Good conduct badge:

Good conduct "badges", in the army, were inverted chevrons worn on the lower left sleeve. Only soldiers with the rank of corporal or below were entitled to wear the good conduct chevrons. One chevron represented 2 years "good" service, two stripes 5 years, three for 12, four for 16, and five stripes for 21 years. Obviously, many soldiers would qualify for the 2 years, but few in the CEF would qualify for more than that. Soldiers with militia or permanent force service would qualify, and may have had several years good service. Good conduct chevrons are not frequently seen in WWI photos.

1914/15 Star Medal:

Authorised in 1918, the 1914/15 Star was awarded to those individuals who saw service in France & Flanders from 23 Nov 1914 to 31 Dec 1915, and to those individuals who saw service in any other operational theatre from 5th Aug 1914 to 31 Dec 1915.

The British War Medal:

The British War Medal 1914-1920, authorised in 1919, was awarded to eligible service personnel and civilians.  Qualification for the award varied slightly according to service.  The basic requirement for army personnel and civilians was that they either entered a theatre of war, or rendered approved service overseas between 5th Aug 1914 and 11 Nov  1918.  Service in Russia in 1919 & 1920 also qualified for the award.

The Victory Medal:

The Victory Medal 1914-1919 was authorised in 1919 and was awarded to all eligible personnel who served on the establishment of a unit in an operational theatre.